“Fine dining meets rock ‘n’ roll” was the concept for the conversion of a chapel in a former military hospital. Sounds incongruous? Absolutely. The result is anything but, seamlessly mixing luxe materials with a sense of morbid humour. Piet Boon Studio’s restaurant design for The Jane preserved the original chapel ceiling while creating a highly unique and contemporary dining space below. The centrepiece is the 800kg chandelier, custom made by .PS lab, a precarious piece that adds movement and directionality to the formally styled tables below. Watch the ‘making of’ video to see how the studio realised such an ambitious design.

The windows of the chapel have been replaced by stained glass, but again, it’s not the expected images of religious figures and biblical symbols. Designed by Studio Job, 500 panels show off a vivid, tattoo-style assortment of imagery – a bizarre and humorous mix ranging from gas masks to birthday cakes to penguins.

However, The Jane’s design doesn’t play novelty at the cost of functionality. The materials – natural stone, oak and leather – are made to age. Subdued in tone, they don’t seek to draw attention away from the more exuberant features of the space but instead to add complexity and sophistication to the dining experience. Elegance and irreverence. Stained glass and tattoo art. Like fine dining and rock ‘n’ roll: they shouldn’t work, but they do.

Photo: Richard Powers

Photo: Richard Powers

Photo: Richard Powers

For more images and details see Piet Boon Studio, Yatzer & Archdaily.