Archives for posts with tag: restaurant

Chaotic, fragmented and vibrant, Philippe Starck’s take on Asian fusion is a crazy blend of cultures and colours. In the futuristic design, technology comes to the fore – the surface of the 26 metre long table is constructed from screens looping news channels from all over Asia, while scattered grains of rice are projected onto the walls. Combined with psychedelic wallpaper and eclectic lighting, the effect is of entering a world somewhere between Bladerunner and Alice and Wonderland. The concept revolves around the fictional Miss Ko – a faceless character covered in Yakuza-style full body tattoos that symbolise the junction of the modernity and traditions of Asia, as designed by Horikitsune and photographed By Uli Weber. Her form links the graphic design with the interior, giving the insanity of the space a strong sense of narrative. More at Designboom.

photo: designboom

photo: horikitsune

 

With a slick monochromatic palette and backstreet location, Michigan’s CVLT Pizza has some cool credentials. The mix of retro game machines, half-peeled graphic wall paper and pared-back design create an environment radically different from the classic pizza joint formula. Bonus points for the striking logo and graphic design. See more images at Retail Design Blog.

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The unique design of El Equipo Creativo‘s Restaurante Pakta finds its inspiration in a fusion of Japanese and Peruvian traditions. Pakta means union in the Quechua language, and this concept is reflected through the duality of the two main sections of the restaurant. The delicacy of the lines that enlace the ceiling and walls and the Latin American informed use of vibrant colour provides a direct link to traditional Peruvian craftsmanship in fabric-weaving, while the bar area at the front is a clear reference to the austerity of Japanese architectural principles. The linearity of the design creates movement and visual interest within an otherwise small space, and the kitchen is incorporated into the dining experience as a luminous box, where the chefs can seen through glass panels of various opacity.

The Paper Art Garden by Super Nature Design uses concentric circles of CNC die cut paper to frame a white orchid at its centre. The geometric patterns create depth of field and an increase in density that both masks and focalises the plant. The cut-outs also allow for expansion of the garden through the intricate shadows they cast outwards. See more at designboom.

Also using screening as a means of both dividing a space and directing attention is I M Lab’s NYU’ Restaurant in Oderzo, Italy. Laser cut metal panels to the ceiling are moveable to delineate different paths and areas within the restaurant, while the perforations vary in size, the biggest apertures drawing the diner’s eye to the pre-existing Roman archeological features of the building. This duality of concealing and revealing brings drama and intrigue to the space.

Barcelona’s Ikibana, designed by El Equipo Creativo, reflects the paradox of its Japanese/Brazilian fusion cuisine. Fluid, dynamic and dramatic, the contours of the design create small islands of seating while the wooden panels extend from the seating and weave into the ceiling. The robust, sensuous connotations of Brazil are mixed with the refinement and minimalism of traditional Japanese art – the geometric tessellating tables bring muted tropical colours into the space, while the gardens set behind glass panels are a natural element that complements the artificial ‘forest’ of the woven ceiling. The standout feature for me is the wispy, angular light fittings which float over the bar like dandelion clocks.

More photos and floor plans available at The Contemporist.

This place makes walking the fine line between nostalgia and modernity look effortless. Shortlisted for this year’s Restaurant and Bar Design Awards, the Marylebone location is the perfect mix of Spanish traditional design with a spaciousness that makes it seem both established and contemporary. Eclectic collections of ceramics and books line the walls of the smaller rooms, while sunlight from the floor-to-ceiling windows in the main bar area reflects off patterned tiles. Barcelona-based Lázaro Rosa-Violán’s other projects can be seen here, many of which are becoming my favourite spaces with their filmic quality and retro detailing.

photos: iberica food & culture ltd.